We would like to say a special thank you to everyone who contributed to making this website possible. Click here to learn more.
You are here:

Rainbow Rights and Advocacy group

Rainbow Rights self-advocacy group is a group for people with an intellectual disability in the LGBTIQ community.

A self-advocacy group is for people who have a cause to gather together to have their voices heard in the community.

The group was formed out of an idea from Pride Vic, which is an organisation that works with LGBTIQ individuals with disabilities and the Self-Advocacy Resource Unit (SARU).

Rainbow Rights is a unique group as the only self-advocacy group for people with an intellectual disability in the LGBTIQ community.

We meet fortnightly to discuss issues, think of ways to take our message out into the community, and to plan events and activities.

We also try to find organisations that will give us some funding.

We Want People To Join Our Group Because:

There is strength in numbers and because individuals with an ID in the LGBTIQ community are very isolated, and being part of a group like Rainbow Rights provides them with a community of mutual support. It also gives people the opportunity to learn new skills and learn about their rights. It is important to be able to speak up and have a say about the things in our lives.

Picture of Rainbow Rights Self Advocacy Group stand at an event
Picture of the Rainbow Rights Self Advocacy committee in front of their flag

Our Projects

The Capacity Building project aims to help Rainbow Rights to identify the barriers to real inclusion for people with an intellectual disability who identify as LGBTIQ, and to work with people with an intellectual disability and others, over time, to break down those barriers.

Picture of the Rainbow Rights Self Advocacy Group committee standing in park

Our Issues

Rainbow Rights and Advocacy members are extremely isolated and don’t have a sense of belonging in the general community or the LGBTIQ community and face many barriers.

A lot of work has been done by governments and community organisations to break down the barriers facing people with a disability, but efforts to address the issues faced by people with a disability around sexuality, particularly LGBTIQ, have been patchy.

Importantly for Rainbow Rights, people with an intellectual disability who identify as LGBTIQ have, in the main, remained invisible. There is little research, let alone any specific policy or programs, to deal with that invisibility.

Quotes

  • We speak up for our rights
  • We have the right to have a boyfriend
  • We have the right to get married
  • We should be able to love whoever we want
  • I’m sexy
  • We have they the right to live independently

Self Advocacy Matters

Because it gives us the chance to have our voices heard in the community and make things change for the better.

Contact People

Meeting Times

1-2.30 every second Friday

Meeting Location

Ross House,
247 Flinders Lane,
Melbourne

Skip to content